The SAIMM is a professional institute with local and international links aimed at assisting members source information about technological developments in the mining, metallurgical and related sectors.
twitter1 facebook1 linkedin logo
 

News

New Africa prize highlights engineering as key development driver

New Africa prize highlights engineering as key development driver
South African engineers urged to submit entries

6 March 2014

Engineers from South Africa and other sub-Saharan countries are invited to enter a major new prize which rewards innovation and entrepreneurship in engineering.

The Royal Academy of Engineering (RAEng) today announced the launch of the first Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation and called for entries from engineers connected with universities and research institutions in sub-Saharan African countries.

The Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation is Africa’s biggest prize devoted to engineering innovation, covering all disciplines from mechanical, civil and computing to biomedical, oil and gas, mining and electronic engineering.

“Engineering is crucial to social and economic development in South Africa and internationally,” said Malcolm Brinded, a Fellow of the RAEng and Chair of the judging panel for the prize. The Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation aims to recognise the importance of African engineers and to stimulate innovation and entrepreneurship, while encouraging young people to become engineers by creating successful role models.”

“This new competition is designed to incentivise engineers to use their passion to develop innovative solutions to their country’s challenges. The Africa Prize will demonstrate how engineering is at the heart of economic development.”

South African judge of the prestigious Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation, Liesbeth Botha at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), commended the RAEng for launching the new prize. 

“The Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation will show how African engineers build countries, communities and economies, and put the spotlight on our education system to deliver professional engineers into the economy with the right knowledge and skills,” said Botha.

Engineers from all disciplines are invited to submit innovations with a social, economic or environmental benefit. Entries must be early-stage innovations which have the potential to be scaled-up and are ready for commercialisation. The deadline for entries is Friday 30 May 2014.

A shortlist of entrants will benefit from six months of extensive mentoring, training and support in commercialising their innovation. The overall winner will receive £25,000 and there will be an exhibition of all finalists’ entries.

The Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation is supported by the Shell Centenary Scholarship Fund, Consolidated Contractors Company, ConocoPhilips and the Mo Ibrahim Foundation.

“By encouraging talented engineers to apply their technical and entrepreneurial skills to development challenges in South Africa and the wider continent, we can help build stronger engineering capability, better equipped to develop scalable solutions to all kinds of local and regional challenges,” said Brinded.

“Over the year-long competition, we look forward to seeing great engineering ideas become viable projects that grow economies and improve societies.”

The RAEng is theUK’s national academy for engineering. It brings together successful engineers to advance and promote excellence in engineering. Encouraging and facilitating engineering innovation is a major focus of the Academy’s work, both domestically in the UK and in sub-Saharan Africa. A key component of its focus is on public understanding of engineering and increasing awareness of how engineering impacts lives.

Find out more at www.raeng.org.uk/AfricaPrize or africaprize@raeng.org.uk

Information for editors

The Royal Academy of Engineering
As the UK's national academy for engineering, we bring together the most successful and talented engineers for a shared purpose: to advance and promote excellence in engineering. We provide analysis and policy support to promote the UK's role as a great place to do business. We take a lead on engineering education and we invest in the UK's world-class research base to underpin innovation. We work to improve public awareness and understanding of engineering. We are a national academy with a global outlook. We have four strategic challenges: Drive faster and more balanced economic growth; foster better education and skills; lead the profession; promote engineering at the heart of society.

Judges of the Africa Prize for Engineering Innovation

Chair of Judges: Mr Malcolm Brinded - CBE FREng
Malcolm is Chairperson of the Shell Foundation, and a Non-Executive Director of Network Rail and of CH2M Hill. A British national, he graduated in Engineering from Cambridge University in 1974 and then had a 38 year career in Shell until his retirement, working in Brunei, The Netherlands, Oman and the UK. He was a member of the Royal Dutch Shell Board from 2002 to 2012, being Executive Director of global Exploration & Production from 2004 and of Upstream International from 2009. He was previously Shell UK Chairperson from 1999.  He has been a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering since 2002, and has served on Council and various Committees. He is current Vice-President of the Energy Institute, and a Fellow of the Institutions of Civil and Mechanical Engineering. He was awarded the CBE for services to the UK oil and gas industry in 2002, and the title of Dato Seri Laila Jasa by the Sultan of Brunei in 2011. Malcolm has been a UK Prime Minister's Business Ambassador, and a member of the Nigerian President's Advisory Council (2004-2012), the China International Council on Environment and Development, and was formerly a Trustee of the International Business Leaders Forum and of the Emirates Foundation.

Other judges include:
-
Dr Liesbeth Botha, Executive Director, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research,
  South Africa
- Stephen Dawson, Chairperson, Jacana Partners
- Professor Calestous Juma HonFREng, Harvard Kennedy School
- Dr Bola Olabisi, CEO, Global Women Inventors & Innovators Network

Media queries: Alex van Essche, Proof Communication Africa
alex@proofafrica.co.za +27 (0)11 4824860 +27 (0)82 321 1167

Brigadier Stokes Memorial Award - Corporate Member Notice

SAIMM Logo 1894-20145In 1980 the South African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy instituted a prestigious award to commemorate Brigadier Stokes for his outstanding and unique contribution to the South African Mining Industry over a period of many years.

This award consists of a Platinum medal.

The award is made to an individual for the very highest achievement in the South African mining and metallurgical industry, and is not necessarily based on technical considerations.

As can be seen by the long list of illustrious recipients below, the nomination of an individual for this award is taken after much deliberation and input from the SAIMM Council. We therefore urge Corporate Members to take cognisance of the gravitas of this award when submitting their nominations.

Previous recipients have been:

1980 Mr H F Oppenheimer 
1981 Dr William Bleloch 
1982 Dr F G Hill
1983 Dr Austin Whillier (posthumous)      
1984 Prof D G Krige 
1985 Dr R E Robinson 
1986 Prof M D G Salamon 
1987 Dr T F Muller 
1988 Dr W J de Villiers 
1989 Dr R A Plumbridge 
1990 Mr W G Boustred 
1991 Mr P du P Kruger 
1992 Mr E Pavitt 
1993 Prof D A Pretorius 
1994 Dr H Wagner 
1995 Dr O K H Steffen 
1996 Mr B E Hersov                                         
1997 Prof D W Horsfall (posthumous)
1998 Mr B P Gilbertson
1999 Mr L Boyd
2000 Mr A H Mokken
2001 Mr T L Gibbs
2002 J Ogilvie Thompson
2003 Mr P V Cox
2004 Mr H J Smith
2005 Mr P Motsepe
2006 Prof G T van Rooyen
2007 Dr D H Laubscher
2008 Prof T R Stacey
2009 Dr C J Fauconnier
2010 Prof C T O'Connor
2011 B C Alberts
2012 R P Mohring
2013 Prof H R Phillips                                    

Should you be aware of anyone who would be deserving of this award in 2014, would you please let me have your nomination, together with a short motivation supporting this nomination by not later than Wednesday, 21 May 2014.

All previously nominated individuals will automatically be included for consideration for the 2014 award.

For any further information:

Sam Moolla at sam@saimm.co.zaalt

PREVENTING ‘ACCIDENTS’ IN CONSTRUCTION

Professor John Smallwood, PhD (Construction Management) Pr CM PrCHSA FCIOB MACHASM MACPM MESSA MICOH MIOSH MIoSM MSAIOSH
Department of Construction Management, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

Introduction
Fatalities, injuries, and disease continue to occur in South African construction and the recent Tongaat Mall collapse resulted in a frenzy of media attention, only to dissipate similar to a spent firecracker. Needless to say various stakeholders are interested in the causes, and the Department of Labour has investigated and will continue to investigate the „accident‟. The question is: „What will the findings be?‟

Fatalities, injuries, disease, and inadequate H&S, non-compliance included, will continue to occur till such time that the following are a feature of, and / or optimised in the South African construction industry.

'Failure of management' versus 'Accident'
There is no such thing as an „accident‟ (Myth)! Traditional definitions include, among other: „An unplanned event‟. Are „accidents‟ unplanned? Absolutely not! Any review will indicate that they are meticulously planned by default i.e. through actions and or omissions. Consequently, given that the five functions of management work are planning, organising, leading, controlling, and coordinating, then unplanned events such as „accidents‟ = „failure of management‟ (Reality). Effectively, the aforementioned is a philosophy and constitutes a state of mind. However, the term management must not be construed to apply solely to contractors, as there is a management echelon in all built environment stakeholder organisations, including client, project manager, designer, and quantity surveyor.

Is there a gap between graduate competencies and the expectations of the built environment industry in South Africa?

The construction of the Gautrain, the revamping of transport infrastructure and erection of nine stadia for the FIFA 2010 World Cup between 2006 and 2010 are glimpse of what South Africa can achieve when the State and the private sector seamlessly align planning and construction. However, rolling countrywide service delivery protests are a reminder that not all is well. The Presidency, in the National Development Plan admitted in 2011 that South Africa did not appear to have the capacity to deliver on its policies and programmes.

MANAGER: REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Applications are invited for the newly created position of Manager: Regional Development with the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. The primary purpose of this job is to sustainably expand non-South African membership of the SAIMM by establishing and supporting National Branches in neighbouring countries. Secondary activities are related to representation of the SAIMM on appropriate industry-level forums that support membership growth and Institute sustainability.

MQA gives Wits University over R20 million

17 March 2014 - Johannesburg: The Mining Qualifications Authority (MQA) handed over a cheque for more than R20 million to Wits University on Friday, 14 March 2014. The money will go towards support for seven lecturers in mining engineering and bursaries for 236 students in the following disciplines: analytical, chemical, electrical, industrial, mechanical, metallurgical, and mining engineering, and geology.

Book Review - Digging Deep

Jade Davenport, the author of Digging Deep, has written a very readable book on the historic contribution that mining has made in developing South Africa into a modern industrial state. It is not necessarily a must-read for people in the mining industry, but the book is well written and should be seen as a South African mining biography.

The SAIMM Library

The library has been indexed and sorted. Although it is not as big as we would like it to be, we have a fair number of reference books and a certain amount of resource material.

Access to the library and the control of the borrowing process is in the hands of Kea Shumba.

The titles are available on the website at the following link: http://www.saimm.co.za/saimmlibrary?task=showCategory&catid=32

Sam Moolla, Manager: SAIMM Secretariat

Five Ways To Achieve Success - by Dr J Molete

 J Molete  Five ways to achieve success

A presentation to the Young Professionals of the Minerals Industry 2014 Conference _ organised by the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (SAIMM)

by Dr Joe Molete | 14 March 2014

 

I was honoured as the keynote speaker for the Young Professionals of the Minerals Industry 2014 Conference, which took place from 11-­‐13 March 2014 at Monte Casino on Johannesburg, South Africa. organised by the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (SAIMM). I spoke immediately after internationally renowned scenario strategist, facilitator, best-­‐selling business author, lecturer and speaker, Chantell IIbury from the Mind of a fox who presented about the scenario planning approach. She captivated me as she narrated tactics of a fox versus that of hedgehog as well as the global and local scenarios. While she was busy delivering her address I looked around the room filled with young professionals and wondered if they knew how privileged they are to be exposed to such a world-­‐renowned scenario planner at this early stage in their careers.

I also enjoyed presentations by young professionals who shared the research they are working on in contribution to the mining industry. I was very impressed especially given that some of them were presenting for the very fist time. I wish more students could have such an opportunity to present, network and be exposed to expert knowledge.
In my keynote address I shared the following five key principles for personal success with the young professionals:

1. Have a clear definitiveness of purpose
Napoleon Hill in his classical book, "Think and grow rich", tells us that the first and most important thing for anyone striving to achieve success is to have a clear definitiveness of purpose. This is about having a strong burning desire to solve a problem much bigger than oneself. The  definitiveness of purpose must be a guiding principle around which most of one's life activities are focused. The definitiveness of purpose may slightly change overtime but it is very important that one can be able to articulate it clearly. I used my obsession with beneficiating our biodiversity as an example of my definitiveness of purpose at some given point. A quotation that hits home for me is by Benjamin Disraeli where he says: "I have brought myself, by long meditation, to the conviction that a human being with a settled purpose must accomplish it, and that nothing can resist a will which will stake even existence upon its fulfillment".

2. Focus on continuous development
Jim Rohn reminds us that success is something one attracts by the person one becomes. The one way to become successful is to focus on ones personal development. There are various ways to learn besides getting certificates. Certificates are good in that they give us credibility but they do not guarantee one a job. Other ways to learn include learning from parents, role models, through reading in line with our passions, through journaling and most importantly through trying and failing. For one to be able to learn one must remember to continuously unlearn especially most of the limiting beliefs that hold us hostage. I gave examples about the fact that I spent 14 years in tertiary institutions learning and despite family pressure to go work so as to help my other siblings I became selfish and now I am able to help them much better.

3. Align and integrate your portfolio of passions
The principle here is that some people are not able to focus on just one thing as they become easily bored. They fall into the scatter-­‐brains category like me and they get excited by juggling more than one ball. A portfolio of passions should be manageable and controllable and it is different from just starting many projects and not completing them. The portfolio should consist of demonstrable passions that are being practised and have been around for a very long time. I illustrated this concept using my own portfolio of passions which consists of science, leadership, music as well as entrepreneurship. It is amazing that always after my talks most of the professionals who come talk to be are themselves scatter-­‐brains who are trying to balance their portfolio of passions. Most of the time they just want to be validated as they spent most of the times feeling frustrated by the fact that they cannot just focus on doing research only. I always encourage them to make their studies a priority and make sure they complete least they get distracted by other passions.

4. Understand and balance your motivational trigger
One wise man once said that knowing and not doing is like not knowing. Most people know exactly what they should do but they are not doing it. For example, we all know that we need to exercise to live longer but there are still people who don't exercise. We also know that we need to write our goals down if we want to be successful yet most people are not doing that. On the other hand, there are people who seem naturally motivated. The motivated ones understand their motivational triggers and know how to align their values with what is important. Most people have to be really disgusted before they can take action while others will wait until they are on a burning platform before they act. Working on increasing one's level of self-­‐awareness is always a worthwhile investment. It is also important for one to balance one's extrinsic and extrinsic motivations so that the focus is not only on achieving money and big titles but to live a meaning life. More importantly, it is also beneficial to know which problems to hand over to GOD and which battles are yours to fight. Otherwise one may end up just depressed and solving problems that they are not meant to solve.

5. Write goals as well as share your story
This is an old time principle that does not need further emphasis. It's the one principle that you either or you don't. Once one makes it a habit, one will realise the benefit. I shared with young professionals the importance of writing and planning in the seven areas of life. I also shared the importance of sharing one's message with others. Steven R Covey reminds us in his book, The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness, that our role as leaders is to strengthen our voice and then help others strengthen theirs. Going to your old high school and sharing career advice with young students are some of the examples of helping others strengthen their voice.

I hope and pray that you will be able to apply some of these principles.

Adeus...

Dr Joe Molete is the founder of Dr Joe High Performance Academy, a platform that accelerates professional to positions of leadership, scientific excellence and wealth. This platform supports people to become high performing individuals who drive sustainable organizations. Dr Molete is available for speaking and training. He's on Twitter @drjoemolete.

Obituary - Hugh Scott-Russell

Hugh Scott-Russell passed away in Johannesburg on 20 November 2013. He is survived by his wife Barbara, their four children, and eight grandchildren. Hugh was born in Randfontein on 13 February 1935. He attended junior sch ool in Randfontein and went on to Pretoria Boys High School to complete matric. Hugh joined the Land Bank after school, and two years later he enrolled at the University of the Witwatersrand to study for a BA in preparation for a career in teaching. However, due to a lack of funds he decided to join the mining industry as a geological assistant at Randfontein Estates Gold Mine. This was the start of what was to be a long and distinguished career with Johannesburg Consolidated Investments Ltd (JCI).

SAIMM Advert button072017inner

SAIMM on twitter

Other mining news

Mining Weekly | Africa

The latest mining world news and project information from Africa.
  • Mkango pockets £242 000 windfall on warrant exercise
    TSX-V- and LSE Aim-listed Mkango Resources has reported that 3.86-million warrants have been exercised, booting its coffers by about £242 000. A total of 3.45-million warrants were exercised at a price of 6.6 pence apiece and a further 418 000 warrants were exercised at a price of 3.5 pence each.
  • BMW joins race to secure cobalt for EV batteries
    With one eye on accelerating demand for electric vehicles, BMW AG said it’s talking to suppliers of cobalt and other battery materials amid fears that stocks will run short and push already inflated prices higher. Sourcing of cobalt and other materials is “the most important” question BMW has to address before it decides whether to produce its own battery cells, board member Oliver Zipse said at a media briefing. Currently BMW assembles, but doesn’t produce its own battery cells.
  • Red Rock widens FY losses, but confident of stable financial position
    Despite having widened its losses for the year ended June 30, Aim-listed Red Rock Resources chairperson and CEO Andrew Bell on Friday assured shareholders that the company was in an improved financial position. Red Rock reported a post-tax loss of £1.1-million in 2017, increasing from the losses of £283 280 posted in 2016.